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Recent Citations

Structures of the M1 and M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor/G-protein complexes. Maeda S, Qu Q et al. Science. 2019 May 10;364(6440):552-557.

A compact synthetic pathway rewires cancer signaling to therapeutic effector release. Chung HK, Zou X et al. Science. 2019 May 3;364(6439). pii: eaat6982.

Integrating Hi-C and FISH data for modeling of the 3D organization of chromosomes. Abbas A, He X et al. Nat Commun. 2019 May 3;10(1):2049.

eIF2B-catalyzed nucleotide exchange and phosphoregulation by the integrated stress response. Kenner LR, Anand AA et al. Science. 2019 May 3;364(6439):491-495.

Serotonin transporter-ibogaine complexes illuminate mechanisms of inhibition and transport. Coleman JA, Yang D et al. Nature. 2019 May 2;569(7754):141-145.

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News

November 17, 2018

Chimera production release 1.13.1 is now available; see the release notes for what's new. The Mac version requires OS 10.10 or later.

October 22, 2018

Mac users: the 1.13.1 release candidate and recent daily builds contain a fix for Mojave (OS 10.14). These versions require OS 10.10 or later.

September 21, 2018

Mac users are advised to hold off upgrading to Mojave until we find a fix for Chimera buttons not being shown until the windows containing them are resized.

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Upcoming Events

UCSF Chimera is a highly extensible program for interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, including density maps, supramolecular assemblies, sequence alignments, docking results, trajectories, and conformational ensembles. High-quality images and animations can be generated. Chimera includes complete documentation and several tutorials, and can be downloaded free of charge for academic, government, nonprofit, and personal use. Chimera is developed by the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI), supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (P41-GM103311).

UCSF ChimeraX (or simply ChimeraX) is the next-generation molecular visualization program from the RBVI, following UCSF Chimera.

Feature Highlight

User-Driven Analysis

User-Driven Analysis

Users can easily import structure-related data into Chimera in the form of attributes, or values associated with atoms, residues, or models. The data can be imported with Define Attribute and then represented visually with color ranges, atomic radii, or "worm" thickness. Such data can also be manipulated programmatically in Chimera, and in fact Chimera was designed with extensibility and programmability in mind. It is largely implemented in Python, with certain features coded in C++ for efficiency. Python is an easy-to-learn interpreted language with object-oriented features. All of Chimera's functionality is accessible through Python and users can implement their own algorithms and extensions without any Chimera code changes, so any such custom extensions will continue to work across Chimera releases. Many programming examples are provided to assist extension writers.

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Gallery Sample

Annotated Green Fluorescent Protein

BILD format was used in Chimera to annotate the barrel structure of green fluorescent protein with its centroid, major axis (red arrow), and an enclosing cylinder (shown with green hoops). The BILD file green.bild was generated with the python program green.py using the coordinates in green.pdb. Gallery entry courtesy of Mike Ess, Yeast Resource Center, University of Washington. (More samples...)


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